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STS085-325-001 - STS-085 - Documentation of starboard flight deck interior with power and data cables

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-119 crew members get a close look at the cargo installed in space shuttle Discovery's payload bay. The cargo consists of the integrated truss structure S6 and solar arrays. The astronauts are at Kennedy to prepare for launch through Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. The TCDT includes equipment familiarization and a simulated launch countdown. Discovery is targeted to launch on the STS-119 mission Feb. 12. During Discovery's 14-day mission, the crew will install the S6 truss segment and solar arrays to the starboard side of the International Space Station, completing the station's truss, or backbone. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-1238

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA Kennedy Space Center, members of the STS-121 crew take part in the crew equipment interface test (CEIT). Seen here is Mission Specialist Piers Sellers working on part of the replacement trailing umbilical system reel assembly that will be installed on the International Space Station. The CEIT provides hands-on experiences with equipment used on-orbit. Mission STS-121 is the second in the Return to Flight sequence and will carry on improvements that debuted during last year's STS-114 mission and build upon those tests. Launch is scheduled in May. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd0267

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft

THEMIS SPACECRAFT

TERMINATION OF THE SPACE ELECTRIC ROCKET TEST SERT II SPACECRAFT OPERATIONS - 8X6 FOOT WIND TUNNEL

STS072-323-006 - STS-072 - STS-72 crewmember activity in the middeck and flight deck

VACUUM SYSTEM, NASA Technology Images

S130E009598 - STS-130 - Cable Routing in the Cupola

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MASS SPECTROMETER AND CHEVROLET ENGINE

description

Summary

The original finding aid described this as:

Capture Date: 8/15/1979

Photographer: DONALD HUEBLER

Keywords: Larsen Scan

Location Building No: 5

Location Room: CW-19

Photographs Relating to Agency Activities, Facilities and Personnel

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Tags

mass spectrometer mass spectrometer chevrolet engine nasa national aeronautics and space administration high resolution ultra high resolution cw 19 photographs location room chevrolet engine photographer donald huebler location nasa photographs 1970s 1970 s
date_range

Date

1979
create

Source

The U.S. National Archives
link

Link

https://catalog.archives.gov/
copyright

Copyright info

No known copyright restrictions

label_outline Explore Chevrolet Engine, Mass Spectrometer, Chevrolet

AIR PREHEATER, NASA Technology Images

NASA PLUM BROOK NUCLEAR REACTOR - DECOMMISSIONING

SYSTEM TEST FACILITY AND SOLAR CELL ROOF SHINGLE

In the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Building 2, an overhead crane lifts the 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter off its workstand while workers watch its movement. The orbiter is being transferred to a spin table (left, in the foreground) for testing. The orbiter carries three science instruments THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) that will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface, the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface, and characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0573

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Vertical Processing Facility, workers watch while an overhead crane lifts the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) off the stand. The ACS is part of the payload on the Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission, STS-109. The goal of the mission is to service the HST, replacing Solar Array 2 with Solar Array 3, replacing the Power Control Unit, removing the Faint Object Camera and installing the ACS, installing the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cooling System, and installing New Outer Blanket Layer insulation. Mission STS-109 is scheduled for launch no earlier than Feb. 21, 2002 KSC01PD1862

Ukraine - WMD - Dismantlement Project, October 1998 - Inspection team visit to unidentified former Soviet Union (FSU) Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) site

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a solid rocket motor (SRM) hangs in an upright position for mating to a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket which will carry NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. MSL's components include a compact car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for evidence on whether Mars has had environments favorable to microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. The unique rover will use a laser to look inside rocks and release its gasses so that the rover’s spectrometer can analyze and send the data back to Earth. MSL is scheduled to launch Nov. 25 with a window extending to Dec. 18 and arrival at Mars Aug. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2011-6942

The 2001 Mars Odyssey Orbiter rests on the spin table in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Building 2. There it will undergo testing. The orbiter carries three science instruments THEMIS, the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS), and the Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) that will map the mineralogy and morphology of the Martian surface, the elemental composition of the surface and determine the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface, and characterize aspects of the near-space radiation environment with regards to the radiation-related risk to human explorers. The Mars Odyssey Orbiter is scheduled for launch on April 7, 2001, aboard a Delta II rocket from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station KSC01pp0578

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, technicians are installing the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument on the New Horizons spacecraft. New Horizons will make the first reconnaissance of Pluto and Charon - a "double planet" and the last planet in our solar system to be visited by spacecraft. The mission will then visit one or more objects in the Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune. SWAP is a solar wind and plasma spectrometer that measures atmospheric “escape rate” and will observe Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind. New Horizons is scheduled to launch in January 2006, swing past Jupiter for a gravity boost and scientific studies in February or March 2007, and reach Pluto and its moon, Charon, in July 2015. KSC-05pd2306

HANDLING FIXTURE AND INSULATION TEST RIG IN THE ROCKET OPERATIONS BUILDING ROB BASEMENT

ENGINE RESEARCH BUILDING ERB 8X11 TEST CELL SE-6 AND TEST CELL SE-4 CONTROL ROOM

TEST RIG, NASA Technology Images

Topics

mass spectrometer mass spectrometer chevrolet engine nasa national aeronautics and space administration high resolution ultra high resolution cw 19 photographs location room chevrolet engine photographer donald huebler location nasa photographs 1970s 1970 s