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Auxiliary machinery room No. 3 aboard the guided missile frigate USS GARY (FFG 51) at 80 percent completion

Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) INSTRUMENT

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Under the eyes of a Boeing worker (center), STS-113 Mission Specialist John Herrington (left) and Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria (right) learn more about the payload for their mission. Part of the payload on mission STS-113 is the first port truss segment, P1 Truss, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, on the International Space Station. Once delivered, the P1 truss will remain stowed until flight 12A.1. Launch date for STS-113 is under review. KSC-02pd1143

U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley visits

HIGH BAY AREA, NASA Technology Images

STS-51-L Recovered Debris (Orbiter)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the payload bay of Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour, workers and STS-88 crew members on a movable work platform or bucket move closer to the rear of the orbiter's crew compartment. While Endeavour is being prepared for flight inside Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1, the STS-88 crew members are participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT) to familiarize themselves with the orbiter's midbody and crew compartments. A KSC worker (left) maneuvers the platform to give Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman (right) a closer look. Looking on is Wayne Wedlake of United Space Alliance at Johnson Space Center. Targeted for liftoff on Dec. 3, 1998, STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for assembly of the International Space Station (ISS). The primary payload is the Unity connecting module which will be mated to the Russian-built Zarya control module, expected to be already on orbit after a November launch from Russia. After the mating, Ross and Newman are scheduled to perform three spacewalks to connect power, data and utility lines and install exterior equipment. The first major U.S.-built component of ISS, Unity will serve as a connecting passageway to living and working areas of the space station. Unity has two attached pressurized mating adapters (PMAs) and one stowage rack installed inside. PMA-1 provides the permanent connection point between Unity and Zarya; PMA-2 will serve as a Space Shuttle docking port. Zarya is a self-supporting active vehicle, providing propulsive control capability and power during the early assembly stages. It also has fuel storage capability KSC-98pc1216

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Orbiter Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, STS-115 crew members inspect equipment in Atlantis's payload bay. From left are Mission Specialists Joseph Tanner and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper. The crew is at KSC for Crew Equipment Interface Test activities, which involves equipment familiarization, a routine part of astronaut training and launch preparations. The STS-115 mission will deliver the second port truss segment, the P3/P4 truss, to the International Space Station. The crew will attach the P3 to the first port truss segment, the P1 truss, as well as deploy solar array set 2A and 4A. Launch on Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1206

Boswell Bay White Alice Site, Radio Relay Building, Chugach National Forest, Cordova, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, a technician steadies the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) as it is lifted and moved toward the S6 Truss. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1479

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Unpacking of the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) begins in the Space Station Processing Facility. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1476

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Tracy Caldwell (left) assists technicians install the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) onto the upper deck of the S6 Truss. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1482

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Tracy Caldwell (second from left) assists technicians position the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) over the upper deck of the S6 Truss. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1480

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Tracy Caldwell (second from left) assists technicians lower the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) into position onto the upper deck of the S6 Truss. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1481

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Tracy Caldwell (left) assists a technician check out the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) before it is installed on the upper deck of the S6 Truss. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1478

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility line up on the sides of the payload transport canister as an overhead crane moves the P6 integrated truss segment into position above it. After being placed in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1689

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility line up on the sides of the payload transport canister as an overhead crane moves the P6 integrated truss segment into position above it. After being placed in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC00pp1689

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the P6 integrated truss segment is placed in the payload transport canister while workers watch its progress. After being secured in the canister, the truss will be transported to Launch Pad 39B and the payload changeout room. Then it will be moved into Space Shuttle Endeavour’s payload bay for mission STS-97. The P6 comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. The STS-97 launch is scheduled Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1691

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Technicians attach a crane to the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119. KSC-04pd1477

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Technicians attach a crane to the Pump Flow Control Subsystem (PFCS) in the Space Station Processing Facility. The PFCS pumps and controls the liquid ammonia used to cool the various Orbital Replacement Units on the Integrated Equipment Assembly that make up the S6 Photo-Voltaic Power Module on the International Space Station (ISS). The fourth starboard truss segment, the S6 Truss measures 112 feet long by 39 feet wide. Its solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery to the ISS. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. When completed, the Station's electrical power system (EPS) will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays to convert sunlight to electricity. Delivery of the S6 Truss, the last power module truss segment, is targeted for mission STS-119.

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iss station truss s6 pfcs pump sspf kennedy space center technicians pump flow control subsystem pump flow control subsystem pfcs pumps pfcs pumps controls ammonia orbital replacement units orbital replacement units equipment photo voltaic power module photo voltaic power module international space station iss truss segment truss segment measures truss measures feet arrays blanket accordion delivery orbit astronauts blankets system power system eps photovoltaic use eight photovoltaic sunlight electricity power module truss segment sts mission sts nasa high resolution
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15/07/2004
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Kennedy Space Center, FL
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NASA
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label_outline Explore Orbital Replacement Units, Photo Voltaic, Use Eight Photovoltaic

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, workers are ready to move a main bus switching unit into Discovery's payload bay. A main bus switching unit is used for power distribution, circuit protection and fault isolation on the space station's power system. The units route power to proper locations in the space station, such as from solar arrays through umbilicals into the U.S. Lab. The unit will be installed on the external stowage platform 2 attached to the Quest airlock for temporary storage. Discovery is targeted to launch mission STS-120 no earlier than Oct. 20. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-07pd2026

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility bay No. 2, auxiliary power unit 3, or APU3, is in place on space shuttle Endeavour for the STS-126 mission. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. There are three separate APUs, three hydraulic pumps and three hydraulic systems, located in the aft fuselage of the orbiter. When the three auxiliary power units are started five minutes before lift-off, the hydraulic systems are used to position the three main engines for activation, control various propellant valves on the engines and position orbiter aerosurfaces. The auxiliary power units are not operated after the first orbital maneuvering system thrusting period because hydraulic power is no longer required. One power unit is operated briefly one day before deorbit to support checkout of the orbiter flight control system. One auxiliary power unit is restarted before the deorbit thrusting period. The two remaining units are started after the deorbit thrusting maneuver and operate continuously through entry, landing and landing rollout. On STS-126, Endeavour will deliver a multi-purpose logistics module to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for Nov. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1654

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- On Launch Pad 39B, the payload transport canister, with the P6 integrated truss segment inside, is lifted toward the payload changeout room (PCR). The PCR is the enclosed, environmentally controlled portion of the Rotating Service Structure (RSS) (on the left) that supports payload delivery at the pad. At right is Space Shuttle Endeavour with its orange external tank and one solid rocket booster showing behind it. When the RSS is closed around Endeavour, the P6 truss will be able to be moved into the orbiter’s payload bay. The P6, payload on mission STS-97, comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the International Space Station. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch of STS-97 is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1733

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Test Director Ted Mosteller (right) briefs the media about Firing Room 4 (FR4), which has been undergoing renovations for two years. FR4 is now designated the primary firing room for all remaining shuttle launches, and will also be used daily to manage operations in the Orbiter Processing Facilities and for integrated processing for the shuttle. The firing room now includes sound-suppressing walls and floors, new humidity control, fire-suppression systems and consoles, support tables with computer stations, communication systems and laptop computer ports. FR 4 also has power and computer network connections and a newly improved Checkout, Control and Monitor Subsystem. The renovation is part of the Launch Processing System Extended Survivability Project that began in 2003. United Space Alliance's Launch Processing System directorate managed the FR 4 project for NASA. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-06pd1202

A view of the NASA Space Shuttle Program Solid Rocket Booster Deceleration Subsystem, after a parachute drop test at the National Parachute Test Range

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Escort vehicles prepare to leave the Shuttle Landing Facility with the S1 truss (at right) on its trek to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, seen in the background. The aircraft is uniquely built with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads and a "fold-away" nose that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight KSC-99pp1186

Erik Eriksson - 12 st pumpar FK 31 föe Boliden., AB de Lavals ångturbin

A view of the NASA Space Shuttle Program Solid Rocket Booster Deceleration Subsystem, after a parachute drop test at the National Parachute Test Range

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, an overhead crane lowers NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto a work stand. There employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will perform an initial state-of-health check. Then processing for launch can begin, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched May 11 on a six-year mission aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. Liftoff is targeted for 2:26 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 11.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Astrotech Space Operations processing facilities, workers lower NASA’s MESSENGER spacecraft onto a test stand using an overhead crane. Once in place, employees of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, builders of the spacecraft, will begin final processing for launch, including checkout of the power systems, communications systems and control systems. The thermal blankets will also be attached for flight. MESSENGER - short for MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging - will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket no earlier than July 30 on a six-year mission to study the planet Mercury. KSC-04pd0595

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - At Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, a technician installs the blankets around the Swift spacecraft. The blankets provide thermal stability during the mission. Swift is a first-of-its-kind multi-wavelength observatory dedicated to the study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science. Its three instruments will work together to observe GRBs and afterglows in the gamma ray, X-ray, ultraviolet and optical wavebands. Swift is expected to observe more than 200 gamma-ray bursts - the most comprehensive study of GRB afterglows to date - during its 2-year mission. KSC-04pd2078

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Reiter, returning from a 6-month stay on the International Space Station, relaxes in the crew quarters at Kennedy Space Center. Reiter returned to Earth with the STS-116 crew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Landing took place on Runway 15 at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility as the sun set on the shortest day of the year. During the STS-116 mission, three spacewalks attached the P5 integrated truss structure to the station, and completed the rewiring of the orbiting laboratory's power system. A fourth spacewalk retracted a stubborn solar array. Main gear touchdown was at 5:32 p.m. EST. Nose gear touchdown was at 5:32:12 p.m. and wheel stop was at 5:32:52 p.m. At touchdown -- nominally about 2,500 ft. beyond the runway threshold -- the orbiter is traveling at a speed ranging from 213 to 226 mph. Discovery traveled 5,330,000 miles, landing on orbit 204. Mission elapsed time was 12 days, 20 hours, 44 minutes and 16 seconds. This is the 64th landing at KSC. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2886

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iss station truss s6 pfcs pump sspf kennedy space center technicians pump flow control subsystem pump flow control subsystem pfcs pumps pfcs pumps controls ammonia orbital replacement units orbital replacement units equipment photo voltaic power module photo voltaic power module international space station iss truss segment truss segment measures truss measures feet arrays blanket accordion delivery orbit astronauts blankets system power system eps photovoltaic use eight photovoltaic sunlight electricity power module truss segment sts mission sts nasa high resolution