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Don't they wish they had never taken hold of it! / J. Keppler.

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Summary

Illustration shows three men, Isham G. Harris, Augustus H. Garland, and Joseph E. Johnston holding hands and onto connectors attached to an electrical device operated by a figure labeled "Pan Electric Co." and "Dr. Rogers", on the floor at his feet are shares of "Pan Electric Co. Stock"; they are getting a jolt of electricity that surprises Puck who is standing on the left, holding his lithographic pencil. A group of men are standing in the background, observing. A wire connected to "Dr. Rogers" runs out a window and connects to the office of the "Bell Telephone Co." across the street.

Title from item.

Caption: Puck "Dear me! This is really a shocking affair!"

Illus. from Puck, v. 18, no. 467, (1886 February 17), centerfold.

Copyright 1886 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

The invention of the telephone still remains a confusing morass of claims and counterclaims, which were not clarified by the huge mass of lawsuits to resolve the patent claims of commercial competitors. The Bell and Edison patents, however, dominated telephone technology and were upheld by court decisions in the United States. Bell has most often been credited as the inventor of the first practical telephone. Alexander Graham Bell was the first to patent the telephone as an "apparatus for transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically". The telephone exchange was an idea of the Hungarian engineer Tivadar Puskás (1844 - 1893) in 1876, while he was working for Thomas Edison on a telegraph exchange. Before the invention of the telephone switchboard, pairs of telephones were connected directly with each other, practically functioned as an intercom. Although telephones devices were in use before the invention of the telephone exchange, their success and economical operation would have been impossible with the schema and structure of the contemporary telegraph systems. A telephone exchange was operated manually by operators, or automatically by machine switching. It interconnects individual phone lines to make calls between them. The first commercial telephone exchange was opened at New Haven, Connecticut, with 21 subscribers on 28 January 1878, in a storefront of the Boardman Building in New Haven, Connecticut. George W. Coy designed and built the world's first switchboard for commercial use. The District Telephone Company of New Haven went into operation with only twenty-one subscribers, who paid $1.50 per month, a one-night price for a room in a city-center hotel. Coy was inspired by Alexander Graham Bell's lecture at the Skiff Opera House in New Haven on 27 April 1877. In Bell's lecture, during which a three-way telephone connection with Hartford and Middletown, Connecticut, was demonstrated, he first discussed the idea of a telephone exchange for the conduct of business and trade.

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

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Tags

harris isham g isham green garland a h augustus hill johnston joseph e joseph eggleston rogers james harris electricity electric shocks electrical apparatus telephone companies telephone industry actions and defenses cartoons commentary chromolithographs color periodical illustrations don keppler political cartoons vintage images 19th century joseph ferdinand keppler print ultra high resolution high resolution
date_range

Date

01/01/1886
person

Contributors

Keppler, Joseph Ferdinand, 1838-1894, artist
collections

in collections

Telephone

Early Telephone and Telephone Exchanges

Chromolithographs

Chromolithograph is printed by multiple applications of lithographic stones, each using a different color ink.
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Source

Library of Congress
link

Link

http://www.loc.gov/
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on publication.

label_outline Explore Garland A H, Electric Shocks, Johnston Joseph E

Topics

harris isham g isham green garland a h augustus hill johnston joseph e joseph eggleston rogers james harris electricity electric shocks electrical apparatus telephone companies telephone industry actions and defenses cartoons commentary chromolithographs color periodical illustrations don keppler political cartoons vintage images 19th century joseph ferdinand keppler print ultra high resolution high resolution